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Unleash Your Inner Fido: Part 2

by Silver Paw on April 19, 2018

Excercise is physical and mental stimulation. It gives them an activity and burns energy. An exercised dog is usually a better-behaved dog.

Buddying up with Fido for runs can help you reach your goals. Dog owners are two-and-a-half times as likely to get the recommended 150 minutes per week of moderate-intensity physical activity, according to a study published in the June 2015 issue of the Journal of Physical Activity and Health.

Here are 4 more guidelines that will help you have a safe and fun run with your little furry companion.

 

BE FLEXIBLE

Just like any runner, your dog is going to have the occasional off day. Just like humans, sometimes your companion is slow and sometimes he wants to sprint.

 

WATCH THE LEASH

Run slightly behind the dog, leaving some slack in the leash. Avoid having the dog trail behind you, where your legs could get clipped. Running behind your dog also gives you a strong hand and arm to hold your dog in case it lunges after a squirrel, rabbit or another dog. If your dog gives way to chase, grab the lease with both hands and get low into a squat.

 

GET THE RIGHT GEAR

Some people use a running halter that attached at the waist because it doesn't disrupt your natural running form. A four-foot (1.2 metre) leash will help you avoid tripping over the dog or the leash. The closer you can keep the dog, the more control you'll have.

 

START SLOWLY

Watch for signs of exhaustion, such as slowing down, stopping or a change in gait. But be aware that dogs, like people, are prone to going too far, too fast, too soon. Some dogs will just stop running when they're tired but others don't. Make your first run with your dog a "fartlek" workout - speeding up and slowing down as you feel ready. To start, you might run to a stoplight, then walk to a tree, sprint go another landmark, then walk. If the dog doesn't show signs of exhaustion, try a brisk, 30-minute walk. If that is successful, mix walking and running until you can build up to a 30-minute run.

Read part 1 of our post here.

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